lucky gold

Luck of the Irish: 7 Ways to Create Your Own Good Fortune

Happy St. Patrick’s Day! As this holiday (a favorite for us Savannahians) was on the approach, we had been thinking about the concept of luck. The Irish are known for fostering the best of it, but many cultures have unique and fascinating beliefs surrounding the idea of encouraging prosperity.

On this most celebratory day, let’s explore a few! Keep reading to discover seven ways to create your own good fortune …

celtic knot necklace

Photography courtesy of Celtic Knot Works

Switch Up Your Accessories

We’re going to start with an appropriately Irish (and Scottish and Welsh) tip: Wear the Celtic knot! The above necklace by Celtic Knot Works is lovely, if you ask us. But whether as a necklace, tattoo, or otherwise, having this meaningful symbol on your person could certainly improve your luck.

It is also thought that wearing one’s birthstone can encourage better things to come your way and discourage illness.

If your culture or religion has a special symbol, it too could be a token for good luck (which, in some cases, you might call divine guardianship).

house plant

Photography by Juan Pablo Serrano Arenas

Welcome a New House Plant

We’ve all heard of the four-leaf clover’s lucky reputation, but the Irish aren’t the only ones who think that certain plants to bring good fortune. In some Asian countries, bamboo is said to be lucky.

You could even select something meant to bring a very specific sort of fortune, like a money tree.

choosing outfits clothes

Photography by Liza Summer

Cater to Your Color

Around the globe, various cultures have traditions that mandate the wearing of particular colors, and in many cases, this is because they believe them to bring good fortune. For example, Korean brides often wear green because it is a calming color in feng shui, and this has grown into a practice for ample luck. Meanwhile, Irish brides avoid green because it attracts mischievous fairies.

But in most every culture, people agree that it often seems there is a correlation between feeling confident and having the life you want, and what better way to feel confident than to dress in the color you look best in? Do some research (and maybe employ a color consultant like the fabulous Reachel Bagley of Cardigan Empire) to find out if you’re a “Soft Summer,” “Clear Winter,” “Warm Spring,” etc. Then, you’ll be able to build a color palette that perfectly suits your skin tone, and hair and eye colors. If you ask us, dressing in the colors that show you off best establishes some positive juju.

lend a helping hand

Photography by Pixabay

Be Kind and Generous

What comes around goes around and those who give will see the return multiplied … these two long-lived sayings reflect the quite universally human perspective that doing good should bring good.

While it sometimes does seem that the best people have the worst luck, improving upon your interactions with others—endeavoring to be an even better version of you—can only be a good thing.

lucky numbers

Photography by Black Ice

Find Your Lucky Number

In China, four is thought to be a distinctly unlucky number, while in that and other East Asian cultures, eight and nine are very lucky. A quick Google search can tell you if your culture has any such beliefs, but the idea of evaluating one’s own experiences for lucky numbers is interesting too. Is there a digit you’ve seen repeated in every phone number, license plate, or home you’ve had? Maybe it’s a sign!

Once you’ve landed on a number you feel to be lucky for you, it can be beneficial for more than just lotto tickets! Schedule important business proposal meetings, or even your wedding, for dates that contain your lucky number.

seeds

Photography by Lukas

Cast a Spell

Whether or not you believe in magic, poetry-like spells can act almost as a meditation and make one feel at peace with one’s desires. This one by Cerridwen Greenleaf includes a lovely chant …

“Lucky Seed Spell

Take seven seeds and put them on your windowsill during a full moon for seven hours. [Then,] pick up the moon-charged seeds, and while holding in the palm of your hand, speak this wish-spell:

Luck be quick, luck be kind.

And by lucky seven, good luck will be mine.

Plant these lucky seeds well and be on the lookout for blessings to shower down upon you.”

thinking mindset

Photography by Andrea Piacquadio

Embrace a Shift in Mindset

Sometimes, creating your own luck isn’t about accommodating traditions, superstitions, or beliefs in your life. Sometimes, it’s about mindset.

You can find tons of books, podcasts, and online articles about it, but scientists have actually studied the metrics behind “good luck.” Why do certain people seem to have positive outcomes no matter what they do? Or even if they do nothing? No one has managed to answer that question, but many have theorized that mindset plays a role.

Dr. Christian Busch, author of The Serendipity Mindset: The Art and Science of Creating Good Luck, is one such professional exploring the concept.

 

We hope you’ve enjoyed reading through our ideas for how you can create your own good fortune!

A change of environment can make you feel lucky too! If you’ve been contemplating just such a refreshing shift, might we suggest a peek into all Upper East River has to offer …

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