upper-east-river-adler-model

The Adler: A New Take on Southern Charm

The Adler was the first home style on the ground at Upper East River. These historic-styled townhomes are built to look like they’ve lived through generations of Savannah history, aged gracefully through time, and now showcase the classic style and southern charm of this beloved city.

The indigenous architecture and style are reminiscent of early Savannah. The custom made, hand-tumbled brick, antique-colored mortar, ornate wrought iron balconies, and gas lanterns give it that old-world charm that you expect from the oldest city in Georgia.

Classic style, modern flair

The Adler townhomes are built in the spirit of the row houses of Savannah, which became fashionable during the Federal period of the early 19th century. These long, unbroken, and uniformly designed homes are unique in the South. They were mostly found in urban areas and were built to conserve space and emphasize practicality. Many of them remain in the historic district and were the inspiration for the Adler.

The design of the Adler may expertly replicate the authentic look of a historic row house, but walk through the doors and you’ll find these homes are more than a pretty face. These intimate, two- and three-bedroom feature premium interiors, open spaces, high-end decorative finishes, and options like curved staircases and wine cellars. They’re warm and inviting, each with its own unique look, but elegantly tied to Savannah’s history through the intricacies and detail of the workmanship and style.

Celebrating a legacy

You may notice that not only do the style of homes in Upper East River pay homage to Savannah’s history but so do their names.

Leopold Adler was a successful Savannah businessman who purchased a failing Altmayer Department Store in 1878. He reorganized it and renamed it Adler’s Department Store, and with that, a legacy that thrived through subsequent generations began.

In the 1950s, Leopold’s son took over the business and then handed it off to Leopold’s grandson. He kept the store alive until 1985. Adler’s daughter-in-law was one of the famed seven ladies who founded the Historic Savannah Foundation and helped save the well know Davenport House from demolition. Her son, Leopold’s grandson, eventually became president of the Historic Savannah Foundation, championed the Savannah Landmark Rehabilitation Project, and was also a Trustee of the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

It’s only fitting that the Adler design offers homeowners the luxury of today’s styles and conveniences, but is also committed to recreating it with the look and feel that’s distinctly Savannah.

Share this post

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on pinterest
Share on email

Want Early Access?

Join the List.

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Join our list to be notified when the initial lot offerings and model homes are open. You’ll also gain access to insider information about the community and purchasing opportunities.

Upper East River